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1. admissions Q&A – Sir Robert Taylor Society

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srts.mml.ox.ac.uk/2510-0991/- 19k - 13 Feb 2016 - Cached

2. Chastity on the Verge – Sir Robert Taylor Society

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srts.mml.ox.ac.uk/2510-0251/- 19k - 13 Feb 2016 - Cached

3. How does sleep restriction therapy for insomnia work? A systematic review of mechanistic evidence and the introduction of the Triple-R model — Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences

A total of 15 randomised and non-randomised studies investigating SRT met inclusion criteria. ... Our review suggests that SRT targets some of the hypothesised processes but specifically-designed mechanistic evaluations are needed.

www.ndcn.ox.ac.uk/publications/867654- 28k - Cached

4. NPG 1323; Sir Robert Taylor by Unknown artist, after William Miller – Sir Robert Taylor Society

by Unknown artist, after William Miller, watercolour, (circa 1782)

srts.mml.ox.ac.uk/npg-1323-sir-robert-taylor-by-unknown-artist-after-william-miller/- 22k - 28 May 2015 - Cached

5. Crossmodal integration in the primate superior colliculus underlying the preparation and initiation of saccadic eye movements. — PSY

Bell AH., Meredith MA., Van Opstal AJ., Munoz DP. Saccades to combined audiovisual stimuli often have reduced saccadic reaction times (SRTs) compared with those to unimodal stimuli. ... activity. Instead, the reduction in SRT for high-intensity, aligned

www.psy.ox.ac.uk/publications/323549- 29k - Cached

6. Stimulus intensity modifies saccadic reaction time and visual response latency in the superior colliculus. — PSY

As a result, the minimum time for visually triggered saccades was reduced, accounting for the shorter saccadic reaction times (SRTs) observed following high-intensity stimuli. ... Our results establish a link between changes in neural activity related to

www.psy.ox.ac.uk/publications/323550- 28k - Cached

7. How does sleep restriction therapy for insomnia work? A systematic review of mechanistic evidence and the introduction of the Triple-R model — Oxford Neuroscience

A total of 15 randomised and non-randomised studies investigating SRT met inclusion criteria. ... Our review suggests that SRT targets some of the hypothesised processes but specifically-designed mechanistic evaluations are needed.

www.neuroscience.ox.ac.uk/publications/867654- 29k - Cached

8. The Cumulative Incidence of Self-Reported Suicide-Related Thoughts and Attempts in Young Canadians. — Department of Psychiatry

RESULTS: The risk of SRTs was 29% (95% confidence interval [CI], 26% to 31%) in females and 19% (95% CI, 16% to 23%) in males. ... Furthermore, these findings have implications for younger SRT and SA risk management by clinicians and earlier

www.psych.ox.ac.uk/publications/920298- 336k - Cached

9. Crossmodal integration in the primate superior colliculus underlying the preparation and initiation of saccadic eye movements. — Oxford Neuroscience

Bell AH., Meredith MA., Van Opstal AJ., Munoz DP. Saccades to combined audiovisual stimuli often have reduced saccadic reaction times (SRTs) compared with those to unimodal stimuli. ... activity. Instead, the reduction in SRT for high-intensity, aligned

www.neuroscience.ox.ac.uk/publications/323549- 30k - Cached

10. Stimulus intensity modifies saccadic reaction time and visual response latency in the superior colliculus. — Oxford Neuroscience

As a result, the minimum time for visually triggered saccades was reduced, accounting for the shorter saccadic reaction times (SRTs) observed following high-intensity stimuli. ... Our results establish a link between changes in neural activity related to

www.neuroscience.ox.ac.uk/publications/323550- 28k - Cached

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